From DisneyParks.Wikia.com

Many years ago, I watched the movie “Parenthood” with Steve Martin and Mary Steenburgen. They were parents to 3 kids in a large extended family that included another brother and two sisters. The whole family had its struggles but at one particular juncture, the Steve/Mary family was faced with the probability that their older son would need to be in a special school. Steven Martin’s character is frantic and agitated. Mary Steenburgen’s character is more accepting and calm. And then Grandma walks in with a story that blew me away:

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You see, I like the Merry-Go-Round. I am not a fan of roller coasters. Not at all. In fact, most amusement rides scare the you-know-what out of me. But, like it or not, life with ADHD is a roller coaster ride. It’s not that I don’t like fun. I love fun. But my idea of having fun is hanging with my friends and family, not hanging upside down looking for who will hurl first. I like security and calm and I like to be in a position to observe my surroundings instead of worrying about whether, despite safety precautions, I might be ejected out of a Coaster and plunge to my bloody death.

Dramatic much?

I’m a Southern California girl, so when I say I didn’t ride the Matterhorn Bobsleds at Disneyland until I was 11, that’s saying something. Kids as young as 7 or 8 ride that thing.

The first time I went on it, I screamed and screamed and screamed. It was terrifying. A couple years later, I rode on the bobsleds again, and I screamed again but I also laughed a tiny bit. A couple years later, I rode the bobsleds again and I laughed my head off. I had so much fun. I went on the ride several times that day. By the time I hit 16 or 17, I was blasé about the whole thing. It was good fun but nothing worth screaming about.

Managing the ADHD roller coaster

Years later I realized that the Matterhorn Bobsleds are a metaphor for life and those dips when your stomach falls to your toes or rises into your throat. Those of us living with ADHD certainly knows those dips, don’t we? At first, you’re paralyzed with fear and a feeling that life may never be the same again. You screwed up! How can anything that messed up ever be fixed?? The next few times you hit the wall you realize you’re not going to die but you scream and cry and freak out anyway because it’s still a dip and you weren’t expecting it.

The next few times the ADHD roller coaster dips suddenly you feel the jolt but you’re able to recover and laugh it off, knowing that ADHD isn’t just a series of dips; there are also those magnificent moments.

Eventually, you get bad news or you find out you have to do something you don’t want to do and you smile and think, “I got this. It’s all going to be just fine. It’s happened before and I made it through. I just have to do what I did the last time – stand tall and get some support.”

See what I’m saying??

Living with ADHD might very well be like riding the Matterhorn Bobsleds or some more threatening roller coaster ride, but with repeated experience and repeated growth, comes the assurance that with time, experience and good strong support, YOU GOT THIS.

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Like this post and want more interaction? Check these out:

1. I’m on TwitterFacebook and Pinterest. I’m @GiftedWithADD

2. 45-minute free phone consultation. Schedule here.

3. If you haven’t gotten your copy of “Revolutionize Your ADHD Parenting in One Week,” grab a copy at this link.

xoxoxo, Margit

Copyright 2014 Margit Crane All Rights Reserved

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Spontaneity Can Ruin a Whole Day When You Have ADHD

by Margit Crane on November 4, 2014

 

Spontaneity (or the extreme: impulsivity) is a hallmark of Attention Deficit Disorder and is certainly part of its charm. We tend to enjoy being around spontaneous people because life is rarely dull and it’s usually full of adventures. That’s pretty seductive to people who are attracted to bright, shiny, high buzz things (whatever that buzz may be).

But, when you have ADHD, spontaneity has its downside and it can throw a person into a tailspin.

Let me give you an example of the maze that spontaneity can create:

I use Google Calendar to manage my schedule and I put just about everything on it. Here’s a screen shot of the first thing I have scheduled EVERY DAY. (Scroll down)

Granted, I’m new at this particular activity block, but it was well considered: I was alert, sober, not frazzled, and calm when I agreed to this plan. It’s not something I didn’t think about beforehand. This is the perfect morning for me; it gets everything off to a great start.

I figured I’d start on Saturday, November 1. It didn’t work. I slept until 12 noon and awoke completely in shock that I had slept 12 hours. I spent the rest of the day watching episodes of “Criminal Minds” and “Scorpion” on my computer. I figured “tomorrow is another day.” Sunday, I followed the schedule and got my stuff done. Spent the rest of the day seeing clients and went to bed happy.

Today, I started strong – I meditated, prayed, journalled, and texted my buddy (we text each other because we’re both over-achievers and want to make sure we’re not taking on too much and that we’ve got some fun going on each day). I even went to the gym, but that’s when things went awry. You see, I’m participating in a 100-Workout Challenge and I found out this morning that if I go to the gym twice in one day it counts as two workouts not one!!!!!

The brain cogs start turning and a scheme was hatched!

The superhero wannabe in me got super excited! Instead of following my plan, I decided I’d go to the gym twice today which meant not going home to shower but going home to get my computer so I could sit in a coffee shop and work for a couple of hours and then go back to the gym. Just as I sat down for a pumpkin latte I realized I had forgotten my charger at home and only had 18% of battery power left.

Big long sigh.

I knew immediately that I had done this to myself. Normally I would have gotten showered and dressed and gone to my office with my power cord. But because I thought I’d had a brilliant idea, I decided to be spontaneous, and instead created unnecessary roadblocks.

I solved the problem by following my Stop, Drop, and Roll procedure that I talked about last week. I stopped and, instead of berating myself, I asked how to fix the situation. What little thing could I do to redeem the day? It was then that a voice inside me said, “Start the day over.” So that’s pretty much what I did except that I started where I left off and I went home to shower and get dressed.

To be honest, the rest of the day didn’t go as I had hoped and I didn’t get to everything I had wanted to get to (But remember, I’m an overachiever), but I did put in a good day’s work.

The moral of this tale

Regardless of what you hear about people with ADHD hating schedules and structure, the truth is somewhat different. Look at any wildly successful entrepreneur with ADHD. You can bet there are both schedules and structures in that business. Even professional daredevils have schedules and structures. Surfers, for example, don’t just surf all day long every single day – they may be at the beach, but there are prime times to surf, wave pattens to analyze, there is board maintenance, and there are precautions to take.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that people with ADHD don’t do well with structure. The truth is that people with ADHD THRIVE with structure. And a spontaneous decision can ruin a day, cause physical injury, or alienate friends, colleagues, or associates.

=====================

Like this post and want more interaction? Check these out:

1. I’m on TwitterFacebook and Pinterest. I’m @GiftedWithADD

2. 45-minute free phone consultation. Schedule here.

3. If you haven’t gotten your copy of “Revolutionize Your ADHD Parenting in One Week,” grab a copy at this link.

xoxoxo, Margit

Copyright 2014 Margit Crane All Rights Reserved

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Under-treated ADHD children can become under-achieving ADHD adults

November 3, 2014

Tweet Pin It   As pretty much everyone who has ever met me or spoken to me knows, I’m very upbeat about ADHD. I think kids with ADHD, particularly, kick some serious booty. They tend to be full of vibrant, passionate, creative, delightful, spirited energy. I think they’re hysterical. They can also be frustrated, confused, [...]

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I like this ADHD site: ADDiva.net

November 1, 2014

Tweet Pin It   I like this site. It’s got a ton of reviews of products for adults with ADD and ADHD. Like this page for example!

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ADHD Awarenss Expo: Tips for Adults and Kids with ADHD

October 30, 2014

Tweet Pin It     The ADHD Awareness Expo is on now until November 1. There’s a whole line-up of great speakers, each being interviewed in bite-sized, 15-minute videos. Since each video interview has been recorded, at the end of the day, they are posted on this site. You have to register to have access. [...]

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ADHD Awareness Month: What Do You Do When It All Falls Apart?

October 29, 2014

Tweet Pin It   I have had the worst two weeks in a long time. It was one thing after the other. Among the highlights: my hard drive crashed (fortunately it was backed up), I had a medical procedure that is not supposed to be painful but I was screaming into my hand because of [...]

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ADHD Awareness Expo Has Great Speakers! Register Now!

October 28, 2014

Tweet Pin It   Hey everyone, I want to let you know that the ADHD Awareness Expo is on now until November 1. There’s a whole line-up of great speakers, each being interviewed in bite-sized, 15-minute videos. Shout out to Tara McGillicuddy who organized the event and is the interviewer! And if you miss any [...]

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I Rebooted My ADHD Hard Drive. Should You?

October 20, 2014

Tweet Pin It   A week ago, my hard drive crashed. I’m speaking of the hard drive on my computer. But I’m also speaking of my body and my brain. When a hard drive crashes and everything about your business is stored there (as with my hard drive), it can be devastating. Fortunately, I have [...]

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Are You a Troublemaker?

October 14, 2014

Undoubtedly, some entrepreneurs, perhaps many, actually have ADHD but people who think they’re troublemakers because they’re innovative don’t understand the pain of being called a “Troublemaker” when you never intended to cause trouble in the first place.

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Teaching ADHD Kids & Teens to Self-Monitor Feelings

October 13, 2014

We know that ADHD kids have trouble monitoring their own feelings (you’ve seen it at home) so let me offer some tips for teaching kids about feelings. It’s hard to for kids to understand how someone else feels if they don’t know how they themselves feel!

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